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VRI Child Scholarship Fund: July 2003 - June 2004

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Financial summary

£1,940 was transferred from the Childrens Scholarship Fund to the project in India in June 2003 to cover 2003/4 spending, leaving a balance at 30 June 2003 of £4,001.61.

A further £950 was transferred in January 2004 to assist other schools.

Total income during the year including interest was £2104.12, leaving a closing balance on 30 June 2004 of £5,155.73

Spending on the primary and secondary school at Amarpurkashi

The £1,940 for APK schools has been spent as follows:
  • £520 has been disbursed in scholarships for this academic year (see below for detailed breakdown)
  • £615 spent on salary enhancements for the primary school teachers, to bring their salaries up to local levels
  • £121 was spent on a training session and team-building session for all project staff, including teachers. (this new initiative was very successful; not only was the budget trip to Rishikesh an enjoyable treat for project workers, many of whom are on very modest wages, but it also encouraged staff by helping them to understand the importance of their role in the larger work of the project)
  • £50 was spent on trips and on advertisements for a headmistress.
  • £120 was spent on paint and other materials for murals and teaching aids prepared by project visitors (paint is very expensive, but the murals really do brighten up the school and encourage the children)
  • £25 was spent on vitamin distribution
(please note that this breakdown is approximate, as the money was spent in Rupees)

The remaining funds (approx. £500) will be held at APK to be used on the APK primary and secondary schools as required.

The project hopes to recruit a headmistress with good academic qualifications for the primary school, to provide strong and imaginative leadership. If such a person can be found, then CSF funds will be required to provide an appropriate salary.


Gramodaya Primary School, Amarpurkashi - general progress

There are now 222 children enrolled in the school, of whom 30% are girls. Nearly 85% of the children come from Scheduled and Backward castes (the castes which are classed by the Indian Government as underprivileged)..


Gramodaya Primary School, Amarpurkashi - detail of scholarships

60 primary school children received scholarships. (Total Rs 31,624). A total of £355.72 was spent on fees and 106.43 on clothes.

Class No. of Children Boys
Girls
Nursery 9
7
2
Kindergarten 7
3
4
Year 1 8
6
2
Year 2 7
6
1
Year 3 10
4
6
Year 4 9
6
3
Year 5 10
7
3


Krishi Audyogik Intercollege, Amarpurkashi - general progress

There are now 808 children enrolled in the school, of whom 25% are girls. 83% of the children come from Scheduled and Backward castes (the castes which are classed by the Indian Government as underprivileged).
As this is a government-supported school, government assistance is provided for children from Scheduled and Backward castes, but IVCS scholarships are still needed in other cases.

Krishi Audyogik Intercollege, Amarpurkashi - detail of scholarships

12 secondary school children received scholarships.  A total of £99.43 was paid towards fees and books. (Rs 8,980).

Year No. of Children Boys
Girls
6
2
0
2
7
3
1
2
8
2
2
0
9
1
0
1
10
1
0
1
11
3
0
3

Assistance to other schools

Jafar Pur School

In February 2004, Amarpurkashi Project was approached by people from the village of Jafarpur which is 10 km south of Chandausi. The surrounding area of Jafarpur is very rural and quite backward. There is no secondary school locally and students have to travel to Chandausi or Islamabad once they complete primary school.

A number of Jafarpur villagers knew what the project had achieved at Amarpurkashi, particularly in the field of education, and were keen to initiate something similar in their area, beginning with a junior high school. Promises from local politicians came to nothing so the village chief and leaders from nearby villages approached Amarpurkashi.

As a result, in March 2004, the General Secretary, Field Director and several key members of Amarpurkashi staff, visited the site for the proposed junior high school. They were impressed both by the site itself, which is well situated near a main road, and by the villagers’ sincere intentions to improve educational opportunities in their area.

An initial donation of Rs 20,000 (approximately £250) was made from the Children’s Scholarship Fund and at the beginning of May, Mukat Singh went with other project staff to lay the foundation stone for the school. Admission for Years 6, 7 and 8 was advertised and the school is now running with 4 teachers and two classes in Year 6 and one each in Year 7 and 8 (over 100 pupils altogether) with a sub-committee from APK advising and supervising.

We hope to have a continuing relationship with this school, and assist its development in the future.

Gumsani School

This school in a deprived area has been given a small grant of Rs 4,000 (approx £50) so that it can build toilets. Toilets are important not only for the immediate comfort, privacy and health of the young pupils, but also to help teach good hygiene habits for life.

SAMIKSHA

Dr Satya Dev Sharma, a retired government officer, has spent his retirement years helping the children of slum dwellers in Ghaziabad, a sprawling industrial town near Delhi. He works under the auspices of Samiksha Social Voluntary Organisation which is a registered body. With the encouragement of the project staff at APK, he now hopes to establish a primary school in this area. He intends to "start small", just renting one or two classrooms and recruiting local teachers.

Samiksha will receive £500 from the Children's Scholarship fund to help start the school and pay the rent and wages until it becomes self-funding.
This money has been transferred from the CSF to the project at APK, reserved for Samiksha, and will be transferred to Samisha as soon as Dr Sharma is in a position to make a start on the school.

Gajram Singh Adarsh Junior High School, Chandausi

This school is in a different category from the three described above. It is a very well-run and successful private school with 24% girls on its roll. The degree college principal at APK considers it to be a model school,and is establishing links with the school so that his B Ed students can get some of their teaching experience there. Most of its pupils have no financial problems, and the school does not need any general financial support. However, some of its pupils are from poorer families, and are struggling to pay the fees.

The school has been given Rs 10,000 (approximately £125) from the IVCS Children's scholarship fund to provide scholarships for the poorer pupils.

(note the project originally planned to give a grant to a small and struggling school in the village of Dhanari, but unfortunately this school is not at present in a state in which such a grant could be used effectively)


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